Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels
Iran Hotels

Visiting Iran - Safety - Traveling as a Woman

You are thinking of going to Iran and your mom and friends call you “crazy”? Yeah, we have heard about that. But don’t worry. Just make them refer to a reliable travel guide on Iran and they’ll see how safe Iran is to travel and the number of tourists coming here has increased enormously over the last few years. Here is some information that should stop your friends and family from thinking visiting Iran is not safe. Also keep reading if you are interested in learning about women travelling in Iran and how to dress in this country.

Visiting Iran

Is It Safe to Visit Iran?

Yes, it is! Not talking about Iran’s driving culture, this country is generally a safe place to travel. Crime rate in Iran, especially in the big cities like Tehran, Isfahan, Shiraz, etc. is very low and we have not heard of any attacks on travelers. Most Persians are quite curious about travelers and they will try to talk to you about what brings you to their country. The political situation in Iran is quite stable and there are no inner conflicts that would affect the safety of the tourists. Therefore, most cities and towns in Iran are safe to travel to. But stay away from the areas around Sistan and Baluchistan Province. It borders with Afghanistan and so conflicts have been going on in this area for years, and tourists should not go there.

Visiting Iran

Visiting Iran as a Women

Travelling in Iran as a (single) woman is not a problem and it's very easy. As a female solo traveler, you’ll easily get your Iranian tourist visa, take your IKA airport taxi, book any hotel in Iran you feel like, etc. As a matter of fact, Iranian women are quite active in their society. You see them in Iran gardens, in Iran museums, in offices, in schools, etc. they’re almost everywhere. Also, offered women-only wagons at Tehran Metro and other means of public transport in Tehran, women are always treated with respect and (sexual) harassment is not an issue. But be aware that female travelers definitely attract more attention than males. Because Iran doesn’t see too many tourists, many people will be curious and look at you and will try to talk to you. They’ll tell you about historical places in Iran and some will try to sell Iran tours to you. In case you feel uncomfortable, clearly tell them to leave you alone and they will. Furthermore, if you should ever encounter any problems, other Iranians will definitely try to help you.

Visiting Iran

Visiting Iran and the Dress Code for Women and Men

Iran is a Muslim country and people follow a modest dress code in public. When visiting Iran, you should consider the dress code. Women wear a headscarf, which these days they can wrap rather loosely. Sweaters and shirts need to be long enough to cover the full length of arms. Additionally, women need to wear a coat that is long enough to cover their bums. In the hot summer time you can wear a light H&M/Zara-style cardigan. But make sure you button/zip up. Pants need to cover the ankles. Men can’t wear shorts here either, they need to wear long pants, but T-Shirts are accepted for them.

 

Visiting Iran   Visiting Iran   Visiting Iran   Visiting Iran   Visiting Iran


2/13/2017 4:23:43 PM

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Tatiana Margan on 4/22/2017
Iran is Amazing! Been there twice in the last 2 years. Want to go back!!!
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Dear Tatiana

Comment Code: 1771

Salam!

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سهرابی on 4/17/2017
if iranian people talk to tourists,its not because they dont see tourists!! its bcz they are very kind people and they want to help foreign women and men. i hope you to come and see this country ??its awesome
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Dear nilu

Comment Code: 1694

Salam!

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